June 19 - July 1, 2009
 

© Roger Crait

© Roger Crait

It’s Time for Red so Put the Knives Away
Roger Crait


Urban aboriginal life is juxtaposed with apocalyptic fantasy, where space shuttles hurtle toward cityscapes and skyscrapers
coexist with tepees. The expressionistic works, peppered with satire and social commentary, often includetext meant to provoke thought on modern urban aboriginal existence.

© Adrien Cho

© Adrien Cho

 

 

 

 

 

Future Imperfect
curated by Adrien Cho


Future Imperfect offers a glimpse of the possible, one hundred years into the future, and the effects today’s generation will have on tomorrow’s political, social, cultural and technological landscapes.Twelve local professional digital artists from the film, video game and comic book industries, bring a diverse illustrative vision, both high concept and low brow, to their digital view of the future.

 

 

© Nadya Kwandibens

© Nadya Kwandibens

Transforming Motion
curated by Terrance Houle
The Works Canadian Aboriginal Artist Program


Transforming Motions presents works by three contemporary aboriginal artists, Duane Linklater, Larry Blackhorse and Nadya Kwandibens. This exhibit curated by Terrance Houle, uses photography and film to examine the social, political and economic parallels that First Nations peoples are facing today with movements from rural to urban
environments.

 

© Lisa Brawn

© Lisa Brawn

Throwing of Underpants Strictly Prohibited
Lisa Brawn

A series of woodcuts explores the correlation between temperature raising heartthrobs and global warming from all the heavy breathing the heartthrobs have caused.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Adam Makarenko

© Adam Makarenko


The Miniature Apiary
Adam Makarenko


In the Miniature Apiary series, Toronto artist Adam Makarenko explores destructive human manipulation of nature through the creation of an imaginary territory called the Langstroth Range. Utilizing narrative style and cinematic lighting and colour, Makarenko shows the disastrous effects when William Bjorn intrudes on the range’s unique flora and fauna, including giant bees.