Posts tagged Art Exhibit
Indonesian Diaspora Dancers Sofia Cristanti

A series of oil pastel-mix media paintings demonstrate how Indonesian female immigrant volunteer dancers delivered their best of beauty through the Indonesian traditional dance at Edmonton Heritage Festival. They come from different professional backgrounds and ethnicities, proudly wearing beautiful modernized traditional dress set in poetical, misty, and dreamy landscape interacted with summer sunlight illumination. The artwork series represents an immigrant story of cultural celebration.

Read More
Activities of Kind Connection

Activities of Kind Connection is an excerpt from a body of work exploring themes of human connection and the fluctuation of emotions within the everyday. The subjective colours depict emotions experienced by the characters. Through use of brighter-than-life colour and simplified form, the viewer might move through the compositions focusing on areas of greater detail. The overall even treatment of paint is intended to depict the shared emotions between subjects.

Read More
Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters

Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters is an exploration of the relationship of personality to physicality, perception and self-perception. Each of the people in the oil portraits, some friends, some co-workers, some strangers who Wylie met for the first time at their sitting, self-identify as “oddballs”. They are uncomfortable within norms of social acceptability, but are happiest, and most themselves, outside of the mainstream

Read More
LIMINAL SPACE | | AWASITIPAHASKAN

LIMINAL SPACE | | AWASITIPAHASKAN is a spatial installation about the borders – in all meanings – of First Nations reserves in Alberta. Beginning in 2014 with intense field research at four different reserves surrounding Edmonton: Enoch Cree Nation, Saddle Lake Cree Nation, Onion Lake Cree Nation, Maskwacis: Samson Cree Nation, Ermineskin Cree Nation, Louis Bull Tribe and Montana First Nation, the project has materialised into a collection of collections.

Read More
Celebrate Fibre Arts

Enjoy demonstrations and exhibits of various Fibre Art techniques, both traditional and contemporary, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, with art projects that build community and tell the complex story of Canada’s people and places. Gain an appreciation for how fibre art skills, used long ago for warmth and decoration, are still used today for the same purposes.

Read More
A Possible CANADA

The central message of A Possible CANADA is to evoke conversation about what a possible Canadian society could be, and our role in creating such a society. The images, patterning, and structure of the artwork hold the potential and the capability to facilitate dialogues on this quest. This exhibit consists of two components: the major artwork O’Canada Project and a public participation panel.

Read More
Upside Down and Backwards

A 1975 camping trailer is transformed into a mobile, room-sized camera obscura. The device creates colorful, moving images on the walls inside the device’s chamber, upside down and backwards. Available light and subject matter become site specific “stories” for viewers to consider and re-consider. All sights and sounds seen are ephemeral. No recording devices are used.

Read More
ReFrame: Graffiti as Dialogue 2 iHuman Youth Society

As an organization that serves as a connecting point between Edmonton’s vulnerable youth and the larger Edmonton community, iHuman will bring youth and community members together to explore how an art form that is in many cases viewed solely as a tool for vandalism can be used to enhance community dialogue and beautify this city through a pop-up free wall.

Pubic workshops with various artists will take place daily throughout the festival from 2 – 4 pm. 

Read More
Inside and Out

Inside and Out is a performative installation created by Kasie Campbell, taking place in and around a large scale sculpture created with the help of The Works Interns. The work deals with the anxieties and vulnerabilities the artist experiences as the object of someone else’s gaze. The large sculpture acts as a venue: viewers are encouraged to enter the tight, fleshy space and experience the all consuming feeling of the physical manifestation of those anxieties.

Read More